Milestones: Red Flags to Watch For

Red flags to watch out for when children reach a milestone

Source: By Jessica Snyder Sachs from Parents Magazine

Milestones: Red Flags to Watch For

While young children can reach milestones at different ages, the CDC says you should talk to your doctor and consider an early-intervention evaluation if your child displays any of these signs or has a dramatic loss of skills.

Birth to 4 months

  • Has trouble moving eyes or crosses them most of the time
  • Doesn't respond to loud noises
  • Doesn't notice own hands (by 2 months)
  • Doesn't follow moving objects with eyes (by 3 months)
  • Doesn't grasp objects (by 3 months) Doesn't smile at people (by 3 months)
  • Can't support head (by 3 months)
  • Doesn't babble or try to imitate sounds (by 4 months)
  • Doesn't bring objects to mouth (by 4 months)
  • Doesn't push down with legs when feet are on firm surface (by 4 months)

At 7 Months

  • Seems very stiff, with tight muscles
  • Seems very floppy, like a rag doll
  • Head still flops back when body is pulled to a sitting position
  • Reaches with only one hand
  • Refuses to cuddle Shows no affection for the person who cares for him
  • Persistent tearing, eye drainage, or sensitivity to light
  • Difficulty getting objects to mouth
  • Doesn't roll over in either direction (by 5 months)
  • Can't sit with help (by 6 months)
  • Doesn't laugh or make squealing sounds (by 6 months)

At 1 Year

  • Doesn't crawl or drags one side of body while crawling
  • Can't stand when supported
  • Doesn't search for objects that he sees being hidden
  • Says no single words
  • Doesn't use gestures such as shaking head "no"
  • Doesn't point to objects or pictures
  • Can't walk (by 18 months)
  • Doesn't walk heel-toe within a few months of walking

At 2 Years

  • Doesn't speak at least 15 words
  • Doesn't use two-word sentences
  • Doesn't imitate actions or words
  • Doesn't follow simple instructions
  • Can't push a wheeled toy

At 3 Years

  • Frequently falls or has difficulty with stairs
  • Drools persistently or speaks unclearly
  • Can't build a tower of more than four blocks
  • Has trouble manipulating small objects
  • Can't copy a circle
  • Can't communicate in short phrases
  • Doesn't engage in pretend play
  • Doesn't understand simple instructions
  • Shows no interest in other children
  • Makes poor eye contact
  • Has little interest in toys

Related Blog Posts

How children worry about their bodies

Young Kids worried about their body: Study

A new study is highlighting a disturbing trend about how children view their own bodies.

Learn more
brain image

Explaining some challenges for Individuals with ASD using the Polyvagal Theory

WHAT IS THE POLYVAGAL THEORY?

The Polyvagal Theory, proposed and developed by Dr Stephen Porges, is a paradigm shift in understanding behaviour and outlines the importance of the body in understanding the mind.

The theory focuses on our developing nervous system a

Learn more
Tips to encourage children to eat healthy

Top 4 Tips on Preventing Children's Eating Disorders Through Healthy Eating

Many kids and teenagers, especially those who are undergoing puberty, are particularly self-conscious about their body and the way they look. Due to peer pressure and because society has been programmed to think that "thin is beautiful," some of these children can become even more concerned and

Learn more